7 reasons why The Sopranos is still 'capo di tutti capi' in 2024

2024. A year where the world of television keeps getting flooded with newcomers trying to take the stripes and medals, earned by the veterans in the business. But in this chaotic battle of streaming services and top-notch releases, one show remains seated in it's multi-million dollar mansion, sipping on a whiskey and puffing on a cuban. The Sopranos. Let's take a deep dive into why, in the hilarious, drama-packed world of television, The Sopranos is still the 'capo di tutti capi'.

1/5/20244 min read

2024. A year where the world of television keeps getting flooded with newcomers trying to take the stripes and medals, earned by the veterans in the business. But in this chaotic battle of streaming services and top-notch releases, one show remains seated in it's multi-million dollar mansion, sipping on a whiskey and puffing on a cuban. The Sopranos. Let's take a deep dive into why, in the hilarious, drama-packed world of television, The Sopranos is still the 'capo di tutti capi'.

  1. Tony Soprano: the mob boss with a 'shrink'

So, we take a look at the main man of the show, Tony Soprano. Big Italian looking guy, gold jewelry and a look on hice face that could make tough guys immediately do a number two in their pants. But here's the interesting part – he's got his issues. All right, I hear you think, 'all criminals have their issues'. But mr. Soprano has different issues. Like, 'let's sit on a therapist's couch and spill my guts' kind of issues. In a world where mob bosses usually just yell, shoot at their enemies and make them sleep with the fishes, The Sopranos brought therapy into the mix. I mean, who knew a mobster could have an existential crisis? In 2024, when even our microwaves, ovens and coffee machines seem to need therapy, Tony's emotional rollercoaster feels strangely relatable. And very progressive for a TV show which aired before the turn of the century.

  1. A show about a genuine crime 'family'

You would think mobsters spend their days breaking knees and counting money, right? Well, The Sopranos don't really care about stereotypes. Of course they're quite fond of a little whacking here and there, but the show also displays their (somewhat) 'human' side. These guys have families, and not just in the 'casa nostra' type of way. They barbecue, make sure their parents are taken care of (even though the parents might feel a little different about this) and they genuinely care about their kids. Even if they are more likely to inherit a strip club with a funny name than a couple of Van Gogh paintings and some jewelry. Well, to be completely honest, it wouldn't actually be that weird to inherit these paintings and jewelry when you're a descendant of New Jersey's most feared mobster. But I would question the way these pieces found their way to his basement. Anyway, in a world where every show wants to be dark and edgy, The Sopranos throws in a sprinkle of family drama, edgy family members and humor to keep things relatable and somewhat light-hearted.

  1. The Sopranos cinematography set a new standard

It is one of the first things you'll hear when you ask someone 'What made The Sopranos so good?'. They redifined the television landscape. People will tell you: without The Sopranos we wouldn't have a Breaking Bad or a Peaky Blinders. I mean, even Bryan Cranston said that without Tony Sopranos, there would be no Walter White. The Sopranos didn't just want to tell you a story; they wanted to make art. When you watch a current TV show, every episode of a season feels like a movie on itself contributing to something bigger. The Sopranos dit that 25 years ago. It's like they let a bunch of film students loose with a camera and said, "Go nuts and bring us something we've never seen." But, hey, it worked. In 2024, when everyone's got a 4K camera in the pocket of their jeans and editing software available in every appstore, The Sopranos' visual mastery is still something only a few people are able to replicate. All hail David Chase.

  1. So accurate that The Sopranos looks like real life

The Sopranos cast, with James Gandolfini at the head of the table, does an outstanding job portaying their characters. This results in the show giving an authentic (and almost hard to distinguish from the real deal) look at the world of organized crime. Unlike many other movies and series that glamorize the mob, this series gives a good look at all its brutality, moral dilemmas, and the price you have to pay when you're that close to 'the life'. James Gandolfini once received a phone call from an unknown person with a rather interesting, yet funny message to compliment him on how good the show depicts the mob life. The person on the other end of the phone told him that he did an outstanding job portaying the mob boss, but he added a very important message. "A don never wears shorts". You might be wondering 'Did Tony Soprano ever wear shorts?' Yes, he did. In the Sopranos, Tony is seen wearing shorts on a number of occasions. Fair play to David Chase, because he actually put this in the series. In the first episode of season 4, Carmine Lupertazzi pulls Tony aside to tell him te same thing James was told in real life. "A don doesn't wear shorts".

  1. Paulie Walnuts

The Sopranos had this crazy idea that mobsters weren't just cardboard cutouts with guns. They had feelings, dreams, and existential crises. Who would've thought that the guy breaking legs for a living also had moments of self-doubt and regret? In 2024, when we're all tired of one-dimensional characters, The Sopranos' mobsters are a refreshing reminder that even tough guys have a soft spot for stray ducks.

  1. Pine Barrens

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  1. The impact of The Sopranos on popular culture

"The Sopranos" has had a profound and lasting impact on both pop culture and television as a medium. It is widely credited with ushering in the "Golden Age of Television," demonstrating that TV shows could achieve the same level of depth, complexity, and quality as feature films. Its success opened the door for other ambitious, character-driven dramas, influencing a generation of TV creators. The show's iconic scenes, quotes, and characters have permeated popular culture, becoming references in other media and everyday conversations. Tony Soprano, in particular, has become a cultural icon, symbolizing the anti-hero archetype. The series' themes and storytelling techniques have been analyzed and discussed extensively, contributing to academic studies on television and media. "The Sopranos" not only entertained audiences but also changed the way people perceive and engage with TV, leaving a significant legacy in the entertainment industry.

Conclusion:

So, here we are, 2024, where TV shows come and go like seasons of a reality show like The Kardashians. Yet, The Sopranos stands tall, unfazed by the newcomers, cigar in hand, laughing at the thought of retirement and all the royalties still coming it's way. It's more than just a TV show; it's a testament to the enduring power of humour, drama, and a bunch of mobsters trying to figure out life (one therapy session at a time). The Sopranos: still making us laugh, cry, and question our life choices in 2024.